Algonquin Negotiation Representatives

The Algonquin Negotiation Representatives (ANRs) comprise the Chief and Council of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation and one representative from each of the nine other Algonquin communities. These ANRs are elected by the Algonquins of Ontario through elections for a three-year term. The most recent ANR election was held in 2014 with the next election anticipated for 2017.

The role and responsibility of the ANRs is to represent the interests of the Algonquins of Ontario with respect to their Traditional Territory in Ontario in the ongoing negotiations of a modern day treaty with the Governments of Canada and Ontario. To view the Terms of Reference for Algonquin Negotiation Representatives, click here.

The Algonquin Negotiation Representatives are as follows:

Clifford Bastien Jr.
(Mattawa/North Bay)
Ronald Bernard
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
Lynn Clouthier
(Ottawa)
Robert Craftchick
H.B.Sc.F., RPF
(Whitney and Area)

Born and raised in Mattawa, Cliff is descended from one of the original Algonquin families who settled in Mattawa in the late 1700’s. He and his wife Linda have made Mattawa their home, as well as their four adult children. Cliff’s main goal in settling the land claim is obtaining benefits that are fair and equal to all Algonquins and will be sustainable for all future generations. Cliff wants to ensure that beneficiary criteria will prevent the extinction of the Algonquin Nation in Ontario. When Cliff was elected Chief of the Mattawa/North Bay Algonquins in November 2006, his goals were to bring Algonquin culture and pride back into the community.

Ron was born in the Spring of 1937, in the home of his maternal grandparents, Frank and Margaret Jane Baptiste Pessindawatch, on Golden Lake Indian Reserve #39 (now called Pikwakanagan).

Ron attended the Radio College of Canada in Toronto where he earned a Second Class Certificate of Proficiency in Radio. This was followed by an enjoyable 35-year career in radio communications with Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard at various worksites in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Upon retirement in July 1992, Ron returned to Pikwakanagan and built a new home on the beautiful site where, in 1957 his grandfather Matt Bernard built his famous 36-foot Birch Bark Canoe.

Ron accepted a nomination and won the Spring by-election for Councillor in 1994, and was again elected in each of the next five consecutive two-year terms. These 11 years brought Ron’s total to 46 years of service to others so, opting to take time for family, he decided not to run in the 2005 election. Following six years of “quiet time” and being very fortunate in the enjoyment of good health with a desire to remain active and (hopefully) productive, Ron is once again an elected member of Council. He holds the portfolios of Language, Culture & Archaeology; and Health, and is the Alternate on the Finance, Personnel & General Administration portfolio.

Lynn Clouthier was born and raised in the Pembroke and Petawawa area of the Ottawa Valley. She attended Ottawa Teachers’ College and earned a B.A. (Eng.) from the University of Ottawa. Lynn taught elementary school for 33 years with the Renfrew and Ottawa-Carleton school boards. Over the years, Lynn has been a union steward, tutor, foster parent, president of her condominium board and has worked as an ANR since 2008.

Bob has worked in the forestry sector in a number of capacities in both the private and public sectors. He has received diplomas from Trent University (Small Business Management and Native Economic Development) and Sault College of Applied Arts (Aboriginal Resource Technician Program), and has an Honours Bachelor of Science Forestry Degree from Lakehead University. Besides his duties as an ANR, Bob and a group of his community members work with local school boards to demonstrate the links between traditional ecological knowledge and Western science.  Bob is a member of a number of local groups including the Algonquin Peoples All nation Gathering, Bancroft Stewardship Council, the Township of South Algonquin Whitney Recreation Committee and the North Hastings Community Fish Hatchery. He remains an active member in the forestry sector with participation in the Aboriginal Resource Group, the Wood Supply Competitive Process and the Forestry Tenure and Pricing process. 

Katherine Cannon
(Kijicho Manito Madaouskarini)
Doreen Davis
(Shabot Obaadjiwan)
Patrick Glassford
(Greater Golden Lake)
Davie Joanisse
(Antoine)

Born and raised in Mattawa, Cliff is descended from one of the original Algonquin families who settled in Mattawa in the late 1700’s. He and his wife Linda have made Mattawa their home, as well as their four adult children. Cliff’s main goal in settling the land claim is obtaining benefits that are fair and equal to all Algonquins and will be sustainable for all future generations. Cliff wants to ensure that beneficiary criteria will prevent the extinction of the Algonquin Nation in Ontario. When Cliff was elected Chief of the Mattawa/North Bay Algonquins in November 2006, his goals were to bring Algonquin culture and pride back into the community.

Ron was born in the Spring of 1937, in the home of his maternal grandparents, Frank and Margaret Jane Baptiste Pessindawatch, on Golden Lake Indian Reserve #39 (now called Pikwakanagan).

Ron attended the Radio College of Canada in Toronto where he earned a Second Class Certificate of Proficiency in Radio. This was followed by an enjoyable 35-year career in radio communications with Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard at various worksites in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Upon retirement in July 1992, Ron returned to Pikwakanagan and built a new home on the beautiful site where, in 1957 his grandfather Matt Bernard built his famous 36-foot Birch Bark Canoe.

Ron accepted a nomination and won the Spring by-election for Councillor in 1994, and was again elected in each of the next five consecutive two-year terms. These 11 years brought Ron’s total to 46 years of service to others so, opting to take time for family, he decided not to run in the 2005 election. Following six years of “quiet time” and being very fortunate in the enjoyment of good health with a desire to remain active and (hopefully) productive, Ron is once again an elected member of Council. He holds the portfolios of Language, Culture & Archaeology; and Health, and is the Alternate on the Finance, Personnel & General Administration portfolio.

Lynn Clouthier was born and raised in the Pembroke and Petawawa area of the Ottawa Valley. She attended Ottawa Teachers’ College and earned a B.A. (Eng.) from the University of Ottawa. Lynn taught elementary school for 33 years with the Renfrew and Ottawa-Carleton school boards. Over the years, Lynn has been a union steward, tutor, foster parent, president of her condominium board and has worked as an ANR since 2008.

Bob has worked in the forestry sector in a number of capacities in both the private and public sectors. He has received diplomas from Trent University (Small Business Management and Native Economic Development) and Sault College of Applied Arts (Aboriginal Resource Technician Program), and has an Honours Bachelor of Science Forestry Degree from Lakehead University. Besides his duties as an ANR, Bob and a group of his community members work with local school boards to demonstrate the links between traditional ecological knowledge and Western science.  Bob is a member of a number of local groups including the Algonquin Peoples All nation Gathering, Bancroft Stewardship Council, the Township of South Algonquin Whitney Recreation Committee and the North Hastings Community Fish Hatchery. He remains an active member in the forestry sector with participation in the Aboriginal Resource Group, the Wood Supply Competitive Process and the Forestry Tenure and Pricing process. 

Katherine has been Chief of the Algonquin Nation Kijicho Manito located in the Bancroft and Baptiste Lake areas since 1995. She was born in Maynooth and has lived in this area all of her life. Her ancestors have resided on the north shore of Baptiste Lake, the headwaters of that lake and the York River  and in Herschel Township in Hastings County. Katherine has been involved in the Algonquin land claim negotiations since 1991. Her hobbies include fishing, hunting crafts, writing stories and poetry, reading history, and gardening. She has spent many days canoeing in Algonquin Park and is familiar with the Park’s many lakes and rivers rivers. Katherine is married with three daughters and four grandsons.

Doreen’s Algonquin name is Eagle Cloud Woman (Migiziw Wan’nakwad Ikwey) of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, a community near Kingston. Doreen was elected in 1995 to the Shabot Obaadjiwan Council, and became an Alternate to the Algonquin Representative in 1997 during a period of earlier negotiations. Doreen was elected Chief of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation in 1999 becoming her community’s representative for the Land Claim Negotiations. She was honored by her community with a head dress in 2005 – designating her as an ancestral as well as elected Chief. She was elected as an ANR in the 2005 elections. Doreen is committed to negotiating a modern day Treaty that will benefit future generations.

Doreen’s career over the years has been in the retail sector, food service and as a financial advisor. Doreen has been married to her husband John for 39 years. They have 3 children and 9 grandchildren.

Patrick has an extensive background in Algonquin governance among the Algonquins of Greater Golden Lake. He was first elected to council in 1999 and has served as its Chief from 2003 to present. Patrick is dedicated to the survival and prosperity of the Algonquin people.

Davie has been a lifelong resident of the Mattawa area, combining work with the Antoine First Nation community with a career as a social services worker and in the forestry sector. His family has lived in Mattawa and the surrounding area for generations. He has been involved in negotiations for the Algonquin land claim for about 10 years on behalf of the Antoine First Nation. He is active with three separate planning teams for forestry management in the region. He has worked with young offenders and in employment counseling and acts as band manager of its commercial operations which include a trading post and restaurant. He is a Bachelor of Arts from Nipissing University and has been awarded an honours diploma as a social service worker (native program) from Canadore College. He is married to Donna and they have two children and three grandchildren.

Dan Kohoko
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
H. Jerrow Lavalley
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
Randy Malcolm
(Snimikobi)
Cliff Meness
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)

Born and raised in Mattawa, Cliff is descended from one of the original Algonquin families who settled in Mattawa in the late 1700’s. He and his wife Linda have made Mattawa their home, as well as their four adult children. Cliff’s main goal in settling the land claim is obtaining benefits that are fair and equal to all Algonquins and will be sustainable for all future generations. Cliff wants to ensure that beneficiary criteria will prevent the extinction of the Algonquin Nation in Ontario. When Cliff was elected Chief of the Mattawa/North Bay Algonquins in November 2006, his goals were to bring Algonquin culture and pride back into the community.

Ron was born in the Spring of 1937, in the home of his maternal grandparents, Frank and Margaret Jane Baptiste Pessindawatch, on Golden Lake Indian Reserve #39 (now called Pikwakanagan).

Ron attended the Radio College of Canada in Toronto where he earned a Second Class Certificate of Proficiency in Radio. This was followed by an enjoyable 35-year career in radio communications with Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard at various worksites in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Upon retirement in July 1992, Ron returned to Pikwakanagan and built a new home on the beautiful site where, in 1957 his grandfather Matt Bernard built his famous 36-foot Birch Bark Canoe.

Ron accepted a nomination and won the Spring by-election for Councillor in 1994, and was again elected in each of the next five consecutive two-year terms. These 11 years brought Ron’s total to 46 years of service to others so, opting to take time for family, he decided not to run in the 2005 election. Following six years of “quiet time” and being very fortunate in the enjoyment of good health with a desire to remain active and (hopefully) productive, Ron is once again an elected member of Council. He holds the portfolios of Language, Culture & Archaeology; and Health, and is the Alternate on the Finance, Personnel & General Administration portfolio.

Lynn Clouthier was born and raised in the Pembroke and Petawawa area of the Ottawa Valley. She attended Ottawa Teachers’ College and earned a B.A. (Eng.) from the University of Ottawa. Lynn taught elementary school for 33 years with the Renfrew and Ottawa-Carleton school boards. Over the years, Lynn has been a union steward, tutor, foster parent, president of her condominium board and has worked as an ANR since 2008.

Bob has worked in the forestry sector in a number of capacities in both the private and public sectors. He has received diplomas from Trent University (Small Business Management and Native Economic Development) and Sault College of Applied Arts (Aboriginal Resource Technician Program), and has an Honours Bachelor of Science Forestry Degree from Lakehead University. Besides his duties as an ANR, Bob and a group of his community members work with local school boards to demonstrate the links between traditional ecological knowledge and Western science.  Bob is a member of a number of local groups including the Algonquin Peoples All nation Gathering, Bancroft Stewardship Council, the Township of South Algonquin Whitney Recreation Committee and the North Hastings Community Fish Hatchery. He remains an active member in the forestry sector with participation in the Aboriginal Resource Group, the Wood Supply Competitive Process and the Forestry Tenure and Pricing process. 

Katherine has been Chief of the Algonquin Nation Kijicho Manito located in the Bancroft and Baptiste Lake areas since 1995. She was born in Maynooth and has lived in this area all of her life. Her ancestors have resided on the north shore of Baptiste Lake, the headwaters of that lake and the York River  and in Herschel Township in Hastings County. Katherine has been involved in the Algonquin land claim negotiations since 1991. Her hobbies include fishing, hunting crafts, writing stories and poetry, reading history, and gardening. She has spent many days canoeing in Algonquin Park and is familiar with the Park’s many lakes and rivers rivers. Katherine is married with three daughters and four grandsons.

Doreen’s Algonquin name is Eagle Cloud Woman (Migiziw Wan’nakwad Ikwey) of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, a community near Kingston. Doreen was elected in 1995 to the Shabot Obaadjiwan Council, and became an Alternate to the Algonquin Representative in 1997 during a period of earlier negotiations. Doreen was elected Chief of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation in 1999 becoming her community’s representative for the Land Claim Negotiations. She was honored by her community with a head dress in 2005 – designating her as an ancestral as well as elected Chief. She was elected as an ANR in the 2005 elections. Doreen is committed to negotiating a modern day Treaty that will benefit future generations.

Doreen’s career over the years has been in the retail sector, food service and as a financial advisor. Doreen has been married to her husband John for 39 years. They have 3 children and 9 grandchildren.

Patrick has an extensive background in Algonquin governance among the Algonquins of Greater Golden Lake. He was first elected to council in 1999 and has served as its Chief from 2003 to present. Patrick is dedicated to the survival and prosperity of the Algonquin people.

Davie has been a lifelong resident of the Mattawa area, combining work with the Antoine First Nation community with a career as a social services worker and in the forestry sector. His family has lived in Mattawa and the surrounding area for generations. He has been involved in negotiations for the Algonquin land claim for about 10 years on behalf of the Antoine First Nation. He is active with three separate planning teams for forestry management in the region. He has worked with young offenders and in employment counseling and acts as band manager of its commercial operations which include a trading post and restaurant. He is a Bachelor of Arts from Nipissing University and has been awarded an honours diploma as a social service worker (native program) from Canadore College. He is married to Donna and they have two children and three grandchildren.

Dan Kohoko is a member of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation and was elected as a Councillor to Pikwakanagan Council in March 2011. Prior to the election, Dan served as the Executive Director for Pikwakanagan First Nation for four years.

Between 1970 and 1982 Dan worked for several government departments in both headquarter and local offices. From 1982-1984 Dan worked as the Executive Director for the National Association of Friendship Centres. Following this position, Dan worked for eight years as a management consultant. His main clientele included First Nation Governments, the Government of Canada as well as other provincial governments.

He also has over six years of experience with the Ohwista Capital Corporation serving as both a Director and President of the Board.

In 1992, Dan signed on as one of three negotiators in the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan comprehensive claim to the Ottawa Valley. He then became the Director of Negotiations before leaving in 1996 to take on the responsibilities as Director of Special Projects for Indian and Northern Affairs Canada where he revamped the federal specific claims resolution policy.

Dan has accumulated a great deal of experience working in both public and private sector organizations with over eighteen years at the executive level. He brings this range of management and executive experience to his current position on the Pikwakanagan Council and as an Algonquin Negotiation Representative on the Algonquin Land Claim Negotiation Team.

Born at Pikwakanagan, Jerry graduated from high school in the community and has over the years worked in accounting and as an architectural and mechanical draftsman. He started his working career in Pikwakanagan, and has lived and worked over the years in Toronto, Detroit, Cleveland and Chicago. Jerry worked for 33 years in the U.S.A. before retiring and returning in 1998 to Pikwakanagan. First elected to Pikwakanagan council in 2000 in a bi-election, he is now in his fifth term and is an ANR. Jerry plays golf and enjoys hunting, fishing, woodworking and carpentry.

Randy has lived within the Algonquin Nation all of his life, becoming involved with the land claim in the late 1990s, first as an alternate and later as the representative for what was then the Ardoch community, which has been renamed as the Snimikobi Algonquin First Nation. In 2002, he was elected as Chief of the Snimikobi and in 2005 as the Algonquin Negotiation Representative (ANR) to work with the Governments of Canada and Ontario to negotiate a Land Claim Treaty for the Algonquins of Ontario.  Randy is a graduate of Algonquin College in both Forestry and in Electronics, and has spent 15 years working for the Ministry of Natural Resources and in electronics repair in private industry and in operating his business. He has taught drivers education at high schools throughout Eastern Ontario for 18 years. He is married with three children and three grandchildren.

Cliff has been a Councillor or Chief for the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation for a number of years. Cliff is a lover of fine old cars and has re-modeled a number of antique and retro vehicles, travelling far and wide to display his cars at shows and meetings. Cliff works with a number of organizations that involve First Nations in the areas of fishing, trapping and hunting, including the Fur Harvesters Auction, Ashinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre and the Union of Ontario Indians. Cliff also works for the community Fire and Rescue Department.

Jim Meness
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
Sherrylyn Sarazin
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
Kirby Whiteduck
(Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation)
Richard Zohr
(Bonnechere)

Born and raised in Mattawa, Cliff is descended from one of the original Algonquin families who settled in Mattawa in the late 1700’s. He and his wife Linda have made Mattawa their home, as well as their four adult children. Cliff’s main goal in settling the land claim is obtaining benefits that are fair and equal to all Algonquins and will be sustainable for all future generations. Cliff wants to ensure that beneficiary criteria will prevent the extinction of the Algonquin Nation in Ontario. When Cliff was elected Chief of the Mattawa/North Bay Algonquins in November 2006, his goals were to bring Algonquin culture and pride back into the community.

Ron was born in the Spring of 1937, in the home of his maternal grandparents, Frank and Margaret Jane Baptiste Pessindawatch, on Golden Lake Indian Reserve #39 (now called Pikwakanagan).

Ron attended the Radio College of Canada in Toronto where he earned a Second Class Certificate of Proficiency in Radio. This was followed by an enjoyable 35-year career in radio communications with Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard at various worksites in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Upon retirement in July 1992, Ron returned to Pikwakanagan and built a new home on the beautiful site where, in 1957 his grandfather Matt Bernard built his famous 36-foot Birch Bark Canoe.

Ron accepted a nomination and won the Spring by-election for Councillor in 1994, and was again elected in each of the next five consecutive two-year terms. These 11 years brought Ron’s total to 46 years of service to others so, opting to take time for family, he decided not to run in the 2005 election. Following six years of “quiet time” and being very fortunate in the enjoyment of good health with a desire to remain active and (hopefully) productive, Ron is once again an elected member of Council. He holds the portfolios of Language, Culture & Archaeology; and Health, and is the Alternate on the Finance, Personnel & General Administration portfolio.

Lynn Clouthier was born and raised in the Pembroke and Petawawa area of the Ottawa Valley. She attended Ottawa Teachers’ College and earned a B.A. (Eng.) from the University of Ottawa. Lynn taught elementary school for 33 years with the Renfrew and Ottawa-Carleton school boards. Over the years, Lynn has been a union steward, tutor, foster parent, president of her condominium board and has worked as an ANR since 2008.

Bob has worked in the forestry sector in a number of capacities in both the private and public sectors. He has received diplomas from Trent University (Small Business Management and Native Economic Development) and Sault College of Applied Arts (Aboriginal Resource Technician Program), and has an Honours Bachelor of Science Forestry Degree from Lakehead University. Besides his duties as an ANR, Bob and a group of his community members work with local school boards to demonstrate the links between traditional ecological knowledge and Western science.  Bob is a member of a number of local groups including the Algonquin Peoples All nation Gathering, Bancroft Stewardship Council, the Township of South Algonquin Whitney Recreation Committee and the North Hastings Community Fish Hatchery. He remains an active member in the forestry sector with participation in the Aboriginal Resource Group, the Wood Supply Competitive Process and the Forestry Tenure and Pricing process. 

Katherine has been Chief of the Algonquin Nation Kijicho Manito located in the Bancroft and Baptiste Lake areas since 1995. She was born in Maynooth and has lived in this area all of her life. Her ancestors have resided on the north shore of Baptiste Lake, the headwaters of that lake and the York River  and in Herschel Township in Hastings County. Katherine has been involved in the Algonquin land claim negotiations since 1991. Her hobbies include fishing, hunting crafts, writing stories and poetry, reading history, and gardening. She has spent many days canoeing in Algonquin Park and is familiar with the Park’s many lakes and rivers rivers. Katherine is married with three daughters and four grandsons.

Doreen’s Algonquin name is Eagle Cloud Woman (Migiziw Wan’nakwad Ikwey) of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, a community near Kingston. Doreen was elected in 1995 to the Shabot Obaadjiwan Council, and became an Alternate to the Algonquin Representative in 1997 during a period of earlier negotiations. Doreen was elected Chief of the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation in 1999 becoming her community’s representative for the Land Claim Negotiations. She was honored by her community with a head dress in 2005 – designating her as an ancestral as well as elected Chief. She was elected as an ANR in the 2005 elections. Doreen is committed to negotiating a modern day Treaty that will benefit future generations.

Doreen’s career over the years has been in the retail sector, food service and as a financial advisor. Doreen has been married to her husband John for 39 years. They have 3 children and 9 grandchildren.

Patrick has an extensive background in Algonquin governance among the Algonquins of Greater Golden Lake. He was first elected to council in 1999 and has served as its Chief from 2003 to present. Patrick is dedicated to the survival and prosperity of the Algonquin people.

Davie has been a lifelong resident of the Mattawa area, combining work with the Antoine First Nation community with a career as a social services worker and in the forestry sector. His family has lived in Mattawa and the surrounding area for generations. He has been involved in negotiations for the Algonquin land claim for about 10 years on behalf of the Antoine First Nation. He is active with three separate planning teams for forestry management in the region. He has worked with young offenders and in employment counseling and acts as band manager of its commercial operations which include a trading post and restaurant. He is a Bachelor of Arts from Nipissing University and has been awarded an honours diploma as a social service worker (native program) from Canadore College. He is married to Donna and they have two children and three grandchildren.

Dan Kohoko is a member of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation and was elected as a Councillor to Pikwakanagan Council in March 2011. Prior to the election, Dan served as the Executive Director for Pikwakanagan First Nation for four years.

Between 1970 and 1982 Dan worked for several government departments in both headquarter and local offices. From 1982-1984 Dan worked as the Executive Director for the National Association of Friendship Centres. Following this position, Dan worked for eight years as a management consultant. His main clientele included First Nation Governments, the Government of Canada as well as other provincial governments.

He also has over six years of experience with the Ohwista Capital Corporation serving as both a Director and President of the Board.

In 1992, Dan signed on as one of three negotiators in the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan comprehensive claim to the Ottawa Valley. He then became the Director of Negotiations before leaving in 1996 to take on the responsibilities as Director of Special Projects for Indian and Northern Affairs Canada where he revamped the federal specific claims resolution policy.

Dan has accumulated a great deal of experience working in both public and private sector organizations with over eighteen years at the executive level. He brings this range of management and executive experience to his current position on the Pikwakanagan Council and as an Algonquin Negotiation Representative on the Algonquin Land Claim Negotiation Team.

Born at Pikwakanagan, Jerry graduated from high school in the community and has over the years worked in accounting and as an architectural and mechanical draftsman. He started his working career in Pikwakanagan, and has lived and worked over the years in Toronto, Detroit, Cleveland and Chicago. Jerry worked for 33 years in the U.S.A. before retiring and returning in 1998 to Pikwakanagan. First elected to Pikwakanagan council in 2000 in a bi-election, he is now in his fifth term and is an ANR. Jerry plays golf and enjoys hunting, fishing, woodworking and carpentry.

Randy has lived within the Algonquin Nation all of his life, becoming involved with the land claim in the late 1990s, first as an alternate and later as the representative for what was then the Ardoch community, which has been renamed as the Snimikobi Algonquin First Nation. In 2002, he was elected as Chief of the Snimikobi and in 2005 as the Algonquin Negotiation Representative (ANR) to work with the Governments of Canada and Ontario to negotiate a Land Claim Treaty for the Algonquins of Ontario.  Randy is a graduate of Algonquin College in both Forestry and in Electronics, and has spent 15 years working for the Ministry of Natural Resources and in electronics repair in private industry and in operating his business. He has taught drivers education at high schools throughout Eastern Ontario for 18 years. He is married with three children and three grandchildren.

Cliff has been a Councillor or Chief for the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation for a number of years. Cliff is a lover of fine old cars and has re-modeled a number of antique and retro vehicles, travelling far and wide to display his cars at shows and meetings. Cliff works with a number of organizations that involve First Nations in the areas of fishing, trapping and hunting, including the Fur Harvesters Auction, Ashinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre and the Union of Ontario Indians. Cliff also works for the community Fire and Rescue Department.

Jim has been involved with the fish and wildlife management issues and has played an important role in the conservation of moose and the protection of the Algonquin Park wolves. He is an active member of the Pikwakanagan Fire/Rescue Department with numerous certificates from the Ontario Fire College for fire protection, chemical, nuclear and bio-hazardous terrorism awareness. He is also certified by the Ministry of Natural Resources in Law Enforcement and by the O.P.P. as a Search and Rescue instructor. Jim has represented the interests of the Pikwakanagan First Nation as a Band Court Representative regarding child welfare issues and has represented community members in Provincial Courts. In his spare time Jim enjoys the outdoors. Elected into Council in 1999, Jim is devoted to representing the members of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation both politically and in the land claim negotiations.

Kirby earned an Honours Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Anthropology from York University and has partially completed a Masters of Social Work from Carleton University. He is the author of Algonquin Traditional Culture, published in 2002, a book that details the traditional culture of the Algonquins of the Kitchissippi Valley at the early period of European contact. Outside of his education pursuits, Kirby has spent his career working for and with Pikwakanagan and First Nation organizations in a variety of capacities that have included being a native counselor, Manager of Education at Pikwakanagan, in management of fish and wildlife, in researching land claims and as a negotiator. Kirby is now in his eleventh consecutive year as Chief and resides in Pikwakanagan.

Richard has spent his entire adult life asserting and protecting the aboriginal rights of the Algonquin people. He began serving the community in his late teens, first as a board member and then as chairman of the Bonnechere Algonquin First Nation (BAFN) governing council. Working for essential social and economic services, he successfully developed a housing and repair service, employment retraining programs and several economic development initiatives. Throughout his 30 years of leadership, Richard has developed a number of corporate bodies based on the concept of self-determination to help improve the quality of life for the Algonquin people by instilling the importance of independence and rediscovering of the Algonquin’s legacy. Richard has served as the elected Chief of the BAFN since 2003. The BAFN, which has a membership of over 1,800 people, has prepared an extensive genealogical and in depth history of its community dating back to the early 1600s. He is Vice President of the Algonquin National Tribal Council (ANTC) and is the elected ANR for BAFN. Richard is dedicated to the healing, rebuilding and strengthening of the Algonquin people.